3 Expert Tips on Diving Alone

SHARING IS CARING!
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There are things other people prefer doing alone, even diving.

During our training, we are told that diving is a team sport. You need to at least have one diving buddy to ensure your safety underwater. However, more are getting into solo diving.

During our training, we are told that diving is a team sport. You need to at least have one diving buddy to ensure your safety underwater. However, more are getting into solo diving.

For PADI-certified diving pros Danny Rivera and Kevin Davenport, it’s the right combination of knowledge, equipment, and risk management. Here are their expert tips for diving alone.

Double your diving gear

There’s nothing worse than being unprepared. Much of the success (or failure) of your dive associates to the kind and amount of equipment you’re bringing with you. Rivera advises, “You need at least two independent breathing supplies, two masks, an SMB or lift bag, a reel or spool for an emergency ascent, at least two cutting devices, and spares for all other essential gear, including redundant timing devices or computers.”

Make yourself reliable

Once you’re diving solo, you need to be your own body. You have to look after yourself twice as hard and be doubly ready for anything. “Solo diving is about being self-sufficient,” says Davenport. “The course involves training the diver to carry their buddy: an extra air source. I tell all my students, ‘As long as you are breathing, all problems can be solved underwater.’ Carrying a redundant-air supply helps solve that issue, and when I say extra, I mean that it is not part of the plan and is only to be touched in event of an emergency.”

Plan everything

Planning is the most critical part of your solo dive. Without calculating risks, foreseeing possible consequences and preparing yourself to deal with situations, you’re going to wind up in trouble. “Self-reliance and a methodical approach to gear assembly are key lessons in my course, in addition to mastering basic skills like buoyancy, navigation, trim and propulsion, plus emergency ascents are covered extensively during the course,” Rivera says. “We plan for the dive where everything goes wrong: Our regulators free-flow, a fin strap breaks mid kick, or a mask falls off underwater. You need to have a calm mindset. You can’t be prone to panic at the slightest inconvenience underwater. And you have to be confident and deliberate while handling whatever emergencies come up underwater.”

Underwater cinematographer. Bimini, Bahamas.

Image source: scubadiving.com